Rss Feed Sites PA DA
www.wingee.com 42 33
www.wilsdomain.com 48 39
www.urlfanx.com 41 30
www.twingly.com/ping 66 66
www.topsiteswebdirectory.com 56 48
www.topix.net/member/register 62 76
www.thevital.net 43 32
www.technorati.com 94 98
www.startups.co 58 50
www.sports-feeds.com 41 34
www.sourceforge.net 88 97
www.sitrion.com 91 89
www.sharedrss.com 32 20
www.rubhub.com 51 44
www.rss-verzeichnis.de 57 63
www.rsstop10.com 48 48
www.rssroot.com 28 21
www.rssreader.nl/rssfeeds.htm 33 35
www.rsspodcastdirectory.com 27 13
www.rssorange.com 35 31
www.rss-network.com 50 40
www.rssmotron.com 39 33
www.rssmicro.com 53 46
www.rssmad.com 46 35
www.rsshugger.com 44 34
www.rss-feeds-directory.com 37 27
www.rssfeeds.org 39 27
www.rssfeeds.com 54 45
www.rss-dir.com 40 29
www.rssbus.com 52 43
www.rss6.com 34 24
www.rss.ph 1 11
www.rocketnews.com 56 48
www.religious-podcasts.net 43 32
www.redtram.com 54 57
www.realtyfeedsearch.com 40 30
www.realty-feeds.net 41 30
www.readablog.com 50 40
www.r-bloggers.com 1 69
www.rapidfeeds.com 61 54
www.quickblogdirectory.com 44 33
www.political-humor.net 38 29
www.plazoo.com 68 62
www.planetusa.us 42 31
www.pingomatic.com 1 68
www.oobdoo.com 49 38
www.ngoid.sourceforge.net 1 97
www.newsxs.com/en 1 35
www.newsnow.co.uk 76 74
www.newsisfree.com 71 66
www.msn.com 96 97
www.mostpopularsites.net 54 44
www.moreover.com 78 74
www.millionrss.com 50 41
www.metafeeder.com 34 22
www.medical-feeds.com 43 34
www.mediapost.com 87 84
www.mdjobscout.com 25 16
www.mappedup.com 46 36
www.loadedweb.com 57 51
www.liquida.com 51 41
www.info-listings.com 54 45
www.icerocket.com 76 70
www.government-central.com 36 26
www.goldenfeed.com 43 36
www.globeofblogs.com 66 60
www.fybersearch.com 55 46
www.fuelmyblog.com 54 45
www.flookie.net 15 30
www.findrss.net 37 29
www.finance-investing.com 42 31
www.feedvault.com 36 24
www.feedster.com 77 73
www.feedstar-rss.wikidot.com 1 81
www.feedshark.brainbliss.com 50 57
www.feedsfarm.com 45 39
www.feedsee.com 45 34
www.feeds4all.com 52 43




Which content is Google taking into consideration?

The expertise, authority, and trustworthiness of a page are determined primarily by looking at the main content on the page. What counts as main content is obvious when we are talking about a content site like a blog, but which content are Google’s quality raters taking into consideration on your category and product pages?
The first important thing to recognize is that “content” is not limited to text. The rater guidelines explicitly state that “webpage content includes … functionality (such as online shopping features, email, calculator functionality, online games, etc.).”
So raters aren’t just being asked to evaluate text. They’re being asked to evaluate your site’s functionality. It isn’t just the text on your page that needs to be high E-A-T, it’s the design, interface, interactivity, useability, and other features.
For example, raters are explicitly asked to “put at least one product in the cart to make sure the shopping cart is functioning.” They are reminded that “high quality shopping content should allow users to find the products they want and to purchase the products easily.” I highly recommend meeting these basic functions expected of the modern ecommerce site in service of that goal:
  • A persistent shopping cart that stores the products you are planning to buy
  • The ability to create a wishlist
  • The ability to sort category pages and search results by price, weighted relevance, review score, best sellers, and similar criteria
  • The ability to filter category and search results by product features and tags
  • A responsive design that looks good and functions well on mobile devices
  • Modern search capable of interpreting queries and dealing with misspellings rather than simply matching text exactly to what is found on the page
Google provides quality raters with some examples of main content. In an example featuring a product page, they consider the content behind the reviews, shipping, and safety information tabs to be main content:

Prerequisites

For quality raters to determine the E-A-T of your shopping pages, there are a few things they need to be able to find to give you a positive score at all.
When raters are evaluating shopping pages, the guidelines ask them to “do some special checks” for “contact information,” including “policies on payment, exchanges, and returns,” suggesting that this information will most likely be found under “customer service.” Make sure this information is present and easy to find.

What is expertise in the ecommerce industry?

The rater guidelines offer an example of a shopping page that earns a high quality score because of its high E-A-T:
They say that the page has “high E-A-T for the purpose of the page” because they have “expertise in these specific types of goods.” They mention that many of the products sold on the site are unique to this company, presumably as evidence of this. They also mention that they have “a positive reputation.”
This suggests that what counts as expertise for a shopping page, according to Google, is the expertise of the manufacturer and the brand regarding the products being sold. The fact that they have a good reputation and exclusive products are used as evidence of this. Needless to say, this means you should only work with manufacturers that have recognized expertise in the industry.
The expertise of those who don’t work for your brand are actually relevant as well. The guidelines ask raters to look for “recommendations by experts, news articles, and other credible information…about the website” while they are doing reputation research for your brand or your content creators.
This emphasizes the importance of outreach in earning a high E-A-T score. Obviously, your products, your site functionality, and your brand integrity must be inherently high in order to earn positive press and recommendations from experts in the appropriate industries, but there are limits to how much your site and products are capable of promoting themselves.
To earn a positive reputation, you will also need to reach out directly to industry influencers and experts, send products to product reviewers, and make headlines by taking newsworthy actions. Failing to do so means that even if your products, brand, and site are stellar, while you won’t have a negative reputation, you will have less of a reputation than those who have made the effort to promote themselves effectively.
Crucially, reputation requires high editorial freedom. Placing sponsored content on sites or promoting your site with ads will not earn you a positive reputation, at least not directly, because content created by your own brand isn’t considered during this research phase.


What is trustworthiness for ecommerce sites?

To be considered high quality, raters are asked to look for “satisfying customer service information” when evaluating shopping pages. This means that any potential questions or concerns that shoppers might have about the product and the buying process should be addressed.
It’s best to be as extensive and comprehensive as possible. The purpose of the product, how to use it, what it looks like, and what results they should expect need to be covered in as much detail as possible.
Information about shipping charges should be transparent and revealed up front.
Return policies, guarantees, and similar information should be easily accessible. The checkout process shouldn’t surprise users by completing before they thought they were making a purchase or introducing fees they were not expecting or warned about.
Contact information, live chat, and customer support should be easy to find.
Remember that Google is considering all of this information main content. This should be reflected in your site design as well. Do not hide this information away or make it difficult to find. Put it where shoppers and human quality raters alike would expect to find it and where it will alleviate any concerns about the buying process.
The guidelines explicitly mention that stores “frequently have user ratings,” and that they “consider a large number of positive user reviews as evidence of positive reputation.”
Needless to say, it’s strongly recommended to introduce user review functionality to your site. User reviews have a well-measured positive impact on search engine traffic. Various studies have found that 63% of users are more likely to buy from a site that features user reviews, that users who interact with user reviews are 105% more likely to make a purchase, that they can produce an 18% lift in sales, and that having 50 or more reviews can result in an additional 4.6% boost in conversion rates.
In addition to allowing users to leave reviews, it’s important to encourage your users to leave reviews. Include automated emails asking your users to leave a review into your checkout process, with emails arriving in user’s inboxes shortly after their product is shipped successfully, or even papers telling them how to leave a review sent with the product.
If you’re concerned that asking users to leave reviews, or allowing them to in the first place, will result in negative reviews, this fear is largely unfounded. A study published in Psychological Science found that buyers were actually more influenced by the number of reviews than by the overall score, even to the extent that this was considered irrational behavior on their part.
Another study found that users are actually more likely to purchase a product with a rating between 4.2 and 4.5 stars, since excessively high star ratings are considered suspicious.
Finally, if you leave users to their own devices, the ones who are most likely to leave a review are the ones who are either extremely surprised by how well things went, or extremely disappointed. Additionally, they will review your products on another site if they can’t do so on yours, and Google’s guidelines ask quality raters to look at other sites for reviews.
For these reasons and more, try asking your users to leave reviews.
One crucial piece of the puzzle for trustworthiness is security. The guidelines specifically call out an “insecure connection” on a checkout page as a reason to consider a shopping page untrustworthy, and a reason to give it a “low” quality rating. While they are specifically talking about the checkout page, it’s best to deploy HTTPS on every page of your site in order to eliminate any source of doubt.
Another example receiving the “lowest” score, is considered malicious because it asks for the user’s government ID number and ATM pin number. While this is an obvious piece of deception that no legitimate checkout page would ask for, consider less clearly malicious features that could lead to distrust. For example, requiring an email address for checkout, without explanation, that automatically adds users to an email list instead of the option to opt into one, is likely to reduce your trust score.

Conclusion

Google’s search quality evaluator guidelines indicate that expertise, authority, and trustworthiness are central considerations for Google’s engineers. To perform well in the search results for the foreseeable future, your pages should be developed as though humans were evaluating them for these factors.
When it comes to ecommerce, shopping pages are of primary concern, and E-A-T functions differently for them than it would for a blog post. A high quality ecommerce site doesn’t just feature authoritative text, its features and functionality are built with E-A-T in mind.
Earn expertise by working with manufacturers at the top of their industry, and by getting your brand and products in front of industry experts. Be authoritative by partnering with authoritative brands and ensuring that everything is easily verifiable. Build trust with user reviews, extensive contact and customer service information, a secure site, and a transparent checkout process.
Invest in these features to ensure that your shopping pages continue to perform well and remain competitive in the long run.